In Memoriam

  • Lori Altshuler, 1957-2015

    Lori had an unparalleled intellectual curiosity, analytical mind, as well as a warm and engaging personality. She formed friendly collegial relationships with equally driven academics in three distinct fields: (1) using neuroimaging to assess underlying causes of mood disorders; (2) conducting clinical trials to assess treatments for bipolar disorder; (3) investigating mood disorders in women during pregnancy, postpartum, and postmenopause.

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  • Seymour Antelman, 1938-2011

    Dr. Seymour (Sy) Antelman was internationally known for the originality and importance of his work on biological effects of stress and the effects of psychotropic drugs on the brain and behavior.

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  • Frank J. Ayd Jr., 1920–2008

    In 1953 Dr. Ayd became the first clinician in the United States authorized by the FDA to study chlorpromazine in patients. In 1955 he published the results, initiating the modern era of psychopharmacology in this country.

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  • George Bartzokis, 1956-2014

    Dr. George Bartzokis, a neuroscientist who originated the theory that the degeneration of the brain’s myelin contributed to many developmental and degenerative diseases, such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s, died of pancreatic cancer on August 22. He was 58.

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  • Henri Begleiter, 1935-2006

    Henri Begleiter, Ph.D., was a leader in the fields of neuroscience, alcoholism and genetics. Dr. Beigleiter was instrumental in organizing the largest study in the world focused on the genetics of alcoholism.

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  • Alan A. Boulton, 1936-2010

    Dr. Alan Arthur Boulton was a pioneer in quantitative research on trace amines including 2-phenylethylamine, tyramine, octopamine and tryptamine, and their involvement in the etiology and pharmacotherapy of psychiatric and neurologic disorders.

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  • Joseph V. Brady, 1922-2011

    Obituaries in the major newspapers reported Joseph Vincent Brady, Ph.D. as the researcher who sent trained monkeys and chimpanzees into orbit to prove that outer space was safe for astronauts.

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  • Wagner H. Bridger

    Wagner H. Bridger, M.D., published over 100 papers, was a founding member of the Society of Biological Psychiatry and President of the Society in 1988 and Editor of the journal from 1992-1997.

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  • John J. Burns, 1920-2007

    John J. Burns, Ph.D., supported basic science research more than any other pharmaceutical executive, both within his company as well as in the academic community. One of his most outstanding contributions was the establishment of the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology.

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  • Enoch Callaway, 1924-2014

    On Friday, August 15, 2014, Enoch Callaway III or “Noch” as his many friends and colleagues called him, passed away peacefully with his family present at his tranquil hilltop home in Tiburon California. Noch was a Founding Member of the ACNP and so much more.

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  • C Jelleff Carr, 1910-2005

    C. Jelleff Carr Ph.D., a founding father of the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, died on February 15, 2005.

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  • Jonathan O. Cole, 1925-2009

    Dr. Cole, a founder and early ACNP president, received the first Paul Hoch Distinguished Service Award. As CINP secretary, 1965-1969, his contributions were recognized with the coveted Pioneers in Psychopharmacology award.

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  • Leonard Cook, 1924-2016

    With the death of Leonard Cook on 30 January 2016, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology lost an important scientist and a significant contributor to the emerging disciplines of behavioral pharmacology and drug discovery. He was a founding member of the ACNP and the first industrial investigator to serve as President in 1982.

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  • Erminio Costa, 1924-2009

    Dr. Costa’s enthusiasm and ability to translate scientific hypotheses into successful experiments were contagious for all his collaborators—more than 300 in 60 years.

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  • John Craig, 1920-2012

    John C. Craig, an Emeritus Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, died suddenly on Sept. 26th of complications related to cardiac disease.

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  • Svein Dahl, 1942-2012

    Svein Dahl, Professor and Chair of Pharmacology at the University of Tromsø, and an ACNP Fellow, succumbed to cancer on December 8th, 2012. He died at his home near Tromsø, Norway, the city where he was born in 1942.

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  • Jose Manuel Rodriguez Delgado, 1915-2011

    Described as “a technological wizard”, Jose Delgado, invented the “stimoceiver”; implanted electrodes which established two way communications with the brain in mobile animals allowing Jose to stimulate different regions, producing changes in affect and behavior.

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  • Thomas P. Detre, 1924-2010

    Thomas P. Detre was a renowned psychiatrist, academic leader, health care visionary and a long-term member of the ACNP. His creative approaches provided a model for the treatment of mental and addictive disorders to move closer to that in other domains of medicine.

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  • Peter Dews, 1922-2012

    Peter B. Dews (1922–2012) passed away November 2 in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital a few steps from Harvard Medical School where he spent the majority of his career and where his intellectual and research efforts shaped the way in which the behavioral effects of drugs are studied.

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  • Samuel Eiduson, 1918-2007

    Samuel Eiduson, Ph.D., one of neurochemistry’s early pioneers, was the prime mover of the four authors of ‘Biochemistry and Behaviour’, which became the first major text for many subsequent investigators.

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  • Joel Elkes, 1913-2015

    Joel Elkes, a founding member and first president of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, passed away on 30 October 2015. He remained active in the ACNP for over 50 years initiating the Joel Elkes young scientist research award in 1986. His pioneering achievements have led to receipt of many awards and the accolade ‘Father of Neuropsychopharmacology’. He was a scientist, mentor, humanistic educator, and an artist.

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  • Everett Ellinwood Jr., 1934-2008

    Everett served us in many capacities. He was President of the Society of Biological Psychiatry and Councilor of ACNP. He was a consultant to several Task Forces of the American Psychiatric Association. He served 5 years on the APA Research Council. He was chairman of the FDA Drug Scheduling Advisory Committee; Chairman of the Drug Abuse Research Review Committee for NIDA; he served on the ADAMHA AIDS Advisory Committee and on the NIMH Research Scientist Development Review Committee.

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  • Wayne Fenton, 1953-2006

    Wayne Fenton, M.D., is best known for his ‘behind the scenes’ efforts at the NIMH to transform clinical research. In 2003, recognizing the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and the largest source of disability for many patients, Fenton led landmark NIMH efforts targeting cognitive impairments for people with schizophrenia.

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  • Barbara Fish, 1920-2016

    Barbara Fish was the singular child psychiatrist among the founding members of the ACNP and a lead researcher of new psychotropics in children in the NIMH Early Clinical Drug Evaluation Units program. She remained a clinician researcher in a full-time academic career, treating the more severely ill children and training many of today’s active child psychiatrists.

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  • Alfred M. Freedman, 1917-2011

    Alfred Freedman was an enthusiastic psychiatric educator and community leader willing to challenge public perceptions and prejudices. He levered the psychiatric world from its self-centered Freudian enthusiasm to caring for the less favored — the homosexual, the addicted, women, and the imprisoned.

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  • Alexander H. Glassman, 1934-2011

    Dr. Alexander H. Glassman was a pioneer and recognized expert on the impact of psychiatric medication on the heart and the impact of depression on the development of heart disease.

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  • Solomon C. Goldberg, 1924-2007

    The research career and contributions of Solomon C. Goldberg, Ph.D., helped forge the field of clinical psychopharmacology clinical trials. His expertise in research methodology and statistics are reflected in the statistical techniques that he was often the first to use in clinical psychopharmacology and in the authorship of articles and chapters with biostatisticians.

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  • Louis A. Gottschalk 1916-2008

    Dr. Gottschalk made national headlines in the late 1980s when he concluded that President Ronald Reagan suffered from cognitive brain impairment as early as his first term, years before the late president was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

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  • Jack Peter Green, 1925-2007

    Jack Peter Green, M.D., Ph.D., was the founding chairperson of the Department of Pharmacology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and led the department for almost 30 years. Dr. Green was among the first to recognize the multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors in the brain.

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  • Thomas Hanlon, 1919-2016

    Dr. Hanlon had a career-long association with Friends Research Institute and resigned his faculty position in 1991 to devote full time to this foundation. He participated in early-treatment evaluation studies on the effectiveness of opioid antagonists in the treatment of heroin addiction, and was involved in designing and conducting numerous psychosocial outpatient treatment trials involving adults with substance use disorders under probation and/or parole supervision.

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  • John A. Harvey, 1931-2011

    John A. Harvey began his long and celebrated career as a faculty member at the University of Chicago. His research career is highlighted by many seminal scientific contributions related to the biochemistry of the brain and the development of behavioral pharmacology.

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  • Gerard E. Hogarty, 1935-2006

    Gerard E. Hogarty, M.S.W., is best known for developing four psychosocial treatment approaches specific to schizophrenia.

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  • Stephen G. Holtzman, 1944 - 2011

    Steve Holzman was a pioneer in the use of drug discrimination procedures to investigate the pharmacological properties of opioids. His scientific publications in the 1970s-1990s contributed significantly to the widespread adoption of drug discrimination methodology to study drug-receptor interactions in behaving rodents and non-human primates; this model continues to play a key role in the preclinical development of new drugs for use in psychiatry and drug and alcohol dependence.

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  • Daniel W. Hommer, 1950-2014

    Dr. Daniel Hammer, 64, chief of NIAAA’s section on brain electrophysiology and imaging, died on Jan. 2. He had served as head of the section since 1992, his second tenure working at NIH. Hammer was born in Easton, Pa., and received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and his M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

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  • Turan M. Itil, 1924-2014

    Turan Itil was born in Bursa, Turkey on August 12, 1924. He received the M.D. degree from Istanbul University in 1948 and moved to the University of Tübingen in Germany for training in neurology. In 1953 he joined the faculty at the University of Erlangen with EEG and psychopharmacology the center of his research. After a decade in St. Louis, he moved to New York Medical College and established the HZI Research Center Laboratory in Tarrytown New York. Oct 2, 2014

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  • Murray E. Jarvik, 1923-2008

    Murray Jarvik was a founding member of ACNP. Murray was best known for his research on nicotine addiction and as a co-inventor of the nicotine patch to help people stop smoking.

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  • Edward G. Jones, 1939-2011

    Ted Jones distinguished himself in many areas of neuroscience. He was unquestionably the world authority on the Thalamus, producing a remarkable two-volume book filled with his own photomicrographs and illustrations. He was a pioneer of the study of cortico-cortical circuitry and the subpopulations of neurons that comprise local cortical circuits and of neuroplasticity in the cortex and thalamus that helped define the field.

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  • Harry L. June, 1957-2014

    Dr. Harry L. June, a Member of the College since 2004, succumbed to cancer on June 7, 2014. A native of South Carolina, Dr. June received his Ph.D. from Howard University in 1990 under Dr. Michael Lewis. Following a postdoctoral fellowship in human psychopharmacology at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. June held a dual appointment as assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis (IUPUI) and the Medical Neurobiology Program at Indiana University School of Medicine.

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  • Samuel C. Kaim, 1911-2012

    As the first director of an Alcoholism Service in the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Sam Kaim helped to compel armed forces personnel to recognize the significance of opioid dependence in Vietnam, leading a charge for expansion of his office in 1970 to become the Alcohol and Drug Dependence Services.

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  • Seymour Kaufman, 1924-2009

    In Dr. Kaufman’s five years at New York University, he matured into an outstanding enzymologist and biochemist and made his first major contribution to biochemistry, the discovery of substrate phosphorylation in the conversion of a-ketoglutarate to succinate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

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  • Ann E. Kelley, 1954-2007

    Dr. Ann E. Kelley led an eminent career in which she made groundbreaking contributions to neuropsychopharmacology. Importantly, Dr. Kelley was a pioneer for women in science and launched the successful careers of a generation of neuroscientists through her mentoring and teaching.

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  • Eva King Killam, 1920-2006

    Eva King Killam, Ph.D., was a founding member of the ACNP and the first female President. Her research focused on the effects and actions of drugs on the brainstem and reticular formation.

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  • B. Kenneth Koe, 1925-2015

    Dr. Koe worked with Albert Weissman in the 1960s, publishing two of the most seminal discoveries in the formative years of neuropharmacology. First, they developed alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, a drug that inhibits brain catecholamine synthesis, and used it to show how amphetamine produced its psychostimulant effects by facilitating the release of catecholamines in the brain. The following year, Ken’s group introduced para-chlorophenylalanine as an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis and showed how it could be used to deplete selectively serotonin in brain. These two drugs have been used by dozens of neuropharmacology laboratories for understanding the critical role of biogenic amines in psychopharmacology and behavioral health.

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  • Roland Kuhn, 1912-2005

    Roland Kuhn, M.D., the discoverer in 1956 of the antidepressant effect of imipramine, died October 10, 2005, at the age of 93.

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  • Albert Kurland

    Dr. Albert Kurland was the founder of the Maryland State Psychiatric Research Center and an eternal optimist who worked energetically and never said an unkind word about anyone.

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  • Louis Lemberger, 1937-2016

    His productivity before and during his time at the National Institute of Mental Health was a springboard from which he ascended to prominence in the pharmaceutical industry and as an International leader in the fields of pharmacology, clinical pharmacology, experimental biology, and drug development. In his role as a clinical pharmacologist, he was the first to administer a number of important drugs, including Prozac (antidepressant) and pergolide (anti-parkinsonian).

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  • Andrew C. Leon, 1951-2012

    Andy Leon spent years training new investigators and was generous with his time and wise advice. His intellectual powers were impressive. Yet, when he helped young investigators who were struggling to design a study or interpret statistics, he would gently correct them, never criticizing or humiliating them. He would say, “Well, I have a slightly different take on that and you may want to consider approaching the problem this way”.

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  • Roger P. Maickel, 1933-2006

    Roger P. Maickel, Ph.D., served 10 years as a member of the Indiana Controlled Substance Advisory Committee, and co-authored numerous scientific papers and contributed to numerous textbooks.

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  • Athina Markou, 1961-2016

    ‘Special’ is the word that comes most readily to mind when remembering Athina Markou. Our field lost a special person when Professor Athina Markou passed away on 18 May 2016, at home with her husband and Greek relatives, after a 4-year battle with cancer. In a life well lived, albeit too short, Athina accomplished a great deal, most visably in her Neuropsychopharmacology career. But Athina was much more than a scientist: there was Athina the Greek citizen; Athina the adventurer; Athina the skier; Athina the balletomane; and Athina the friend/mentor/wife.

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  • Billy R. Martin 1943-2008

    Billy R. Martin was universally recognized as one of the top pharmacologists in the field of cannabinoid research and added significantly to our knowledge of the mechanism of action of nicotine and other drugs of abuse.

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  • Douglas M. McNair

    Douglas M. McNair, Ph.D., and his colleagues empirically confirmed the existence of six mood or affective state factors: Tension-Anxiety, Depression-Dejection, Anger- Hostility, Vigor-Activity, Fatigue-Inertia, and Confusion-Bewilderment.

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  • Nancy Kishlar Mello, 1935-2014

    On November 25, 2013, the neuroscience community lost a wonderful friend and colleague when Dr. Nancy Kishlar Mello died. On both personal and professional levels, Nancy enriched our lives and contributed directly and indirectly to our careers.

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  • Jack Harold Mendelson, 1929-2007

    Jack Harold Mendelson, M.D., Ph.D., devoted his research career to studying the behavioral and biological aspects of alcoholism and drug abuse. He served as chief of the National Center for Prevention and Control of Alcoholism from 1966-1970, the first federal program to focus on alcoholism.

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  • Sidney Merlis, 1925-2009

    Dr. Merlis’ research center was one of the first 15 awardees when Jonathan Cole and the Psychopharmacology Service Center established the Early Clinical Drug Evaluation program in 1960. He was a founding member of both the ACNP (1961) and the CINP (1962).

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  • Peter J. Morgane, 1927-2010

    Peter J. Morgane was a Neuroscientist and Neuropharmacologist. His interest in feeding behavior and the effects of nutrition on brain development were key aspects of his research throughout his career.

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  • Claude de Montigny, 1945-2012

    On October 19, 2012, our Field lost a brilliant mind. Claude de Montigny passed away peacefully during his sleep in his family home in Outremont, Québec. Claude was only 67 years old. The unexpected news that friends and close colleagues received the very next day threw an intense wave of sadness in our hearts.

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  • Loren Parsons, 1964-2016

    Larry’s approach to science was admirable. His data were derived from meticulous methodologies, his results were interpreted with insight, and his publications were carefully composed to convey meanings that were simultaneously conservative and progressive. His breadth and depth of knowledge, coupled with fast intellectual processing, enabled him to interact with myriad collaborators and trainees.

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  • Candace Pert, 1946-2013

    Candace Pert passed away in Potomac, Maryland on September 12, 2013 at the age of 67. She was born in New York City in 1946 and received a B.S. in Biology from Bryn Mawr College in 1970 followed by graduate studies in pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine under Dr. Solomon Snyder.

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  • Alfred Pletscher, 1916-2006

    Alfred Pletcher, M.D., Ph.D., was instrumental in introducing the first monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, the benzodiazepines, and levodopa into medicine. The rise of biological therapies for psychiatric disorders and the introduction of effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease will always be linked to his name.

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  • Sachindra Nath Pradhan

    Sachindra Nath Pradhan, M.D., Ph.D. was an accomplished scientist, a patriotic Indian and a visionary. His vision culminated in creation of the Center for Neurosciences at the Calcutta University. It represents the first such center in Eastern India and one of very few in India.

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  • Maressa H. Orzack, 1927-2011

    Originally trained as an experimental psychologist, Maressa Hecht Orzack studied with three of the founders of what is now called radical behaviorism, B.F. Skinner, W.N. Schoenfeld, and Fred S. Keller.

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  • Frederic M. Quitkin, 1937-2005

    Frederic M. Quitkin, 1937-2005

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  • Oakley Ray, 1931-2007

    Oakley Ray, Ph.D., had the longest tenure of any individual in any elected ACNP position. It is no exaggeration to say that he did the most from an organizational point of view of any of its members to make the ACNP the preeminent scientific society in its field.

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  • Lee N. Robins, 1922-2009

    The research of Lee N. Robins, Ph.D, placed her at the forefront of psychiatric epidemiology research, with a career spanning five decades. Her early work focused on the effect of psychiatric disorders occurring in childhood on later adult life, spawning her seminal work, “Deviant Children Grown Up”, published by Williams & Wilkins in 1966.

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  • Sir Martin Roth, 1917-2006

    Sir Martin Roth, M.D., played a role in the differentiation and classification of mental diseases, mainly those associated with old age.

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  • Merton Sandler, 1926-2014

    Prof. Merton Sandler, Fellow Emeritus of the ACNP, was one of the great founders of the field of Biochemical Psychopharmacology. As he noticed in an interview with Prof. D. Healy “I didn’t even realize I was a psychopharmacologist until many years after I had become one”.

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  • Saul M. Schanberg

    Dr. Schanberg is globally recognized for his ground-breaking research on the importance of touch in normal growth and development, finding that specific types of touch led to better health and shorter hospital stays for premature infants. His discoveries changed the way hospitals and clinics all over the world care for premature infants.

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  • Joseph J. Schildkraut, 1934-2006

    Joseph J. Schildkraut, M.D., is known for his work from the early- to mid-1960s that set the stage for psychopharmacological research in affective disorders for the years since.

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  • Joseph Schoolar, 1928-2013

    Dr. Joseph Clayton Schoolar, of Houston, passed away on May 4, 2013, at the age of 85. He is survived by his wife of 52 years Betty Schoolar, by his brother Larry Schoolar, and many beloved family members including his five children Jonathan, Cynthia, Geoffrey, Catherine, and Adrian. Dr. Schoolar was Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology and Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine.

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  • Mogens Schou, 1918-2005

    Mogens Schou, M.D., had a long and distinguished career dedicated to research on therapeutic uses of lithium rooted in his deep concern for all patients with mood disorders.

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  • Charles R. Schuster, 1930-2011

    As Director of the National Institute for Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Schuster appreciated the complexities of the problems and how effective administration could help make the problems easier to grasp and deal with; the staff of the Institute could sense his enjoyment. He avoided many pitfalls, and never came to think that he would solve the public’s problem. Throughout the rest of his career, he often remarked on the perspective and excitement that the Directorship afforded him.

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  • Lewis S. Seiden, 1934-2007

    Lewis S. Seiden, Ph.D., is known as a pioneer in the fields of behavioral pharmacology and amphetamine neurotoxicology. He was a Professor Emeritus of pharmacological and physiological sciences and of psychiatry at the University of Chicago at the time of his death.

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  • David Segal, 1942-2005

    David Segal, Ph.D., was nationally and internationally known as an expert and a creative scientific leader in the study of the long-term effects of drugs on behavior and the neurochemical mechanisms of adaptation.

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  • Jerry Sepinwall, 1940-1998

    Jerry Sepinwall died on August 5, 1998, at the age of 57 of a recurrent episode of cancer.  He was a respected member of ACNP and a personal friend and colleague with whom I had the pleasure to collaborate in the Department of Pharmacology at Hoffmann La Roche for 14 years.

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  • Toni S. Shippenberg, 1955-2012

    Toni Shippenberg’s contributions to the fields of Neuroscience and Neuropharmacology over the years were outstanding and are reflected by the high esteem she was held in by colleagues within NIH as well as throughout the United States and abroad.

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  • Albert Sjoerdsma, 1924 - 2014

    Dr. Sjoerdsma’s pioneering work with biogenic amines, initially in collaboration with the laboratories of Dr. Sidney Udenfriend, led to the elucidation of serotonin’s metabolic degradation to 5-HIAA, discovery of the malignant carcinoid syndrome, elaboration of the clinical and biochemical manifestations of pheochromocytoma, and identification of the mechanism of action of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in humans.

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  • Robert Bruce Sloane, 1923-2007

    Robert Bruce Sloane, M.D., published widely including papers with Stanley Cobb, Ted Sourkes (which was one of the earliest papers on catecholamines and mental illness), and Murray Saffrin on steroids all in the late 50s.

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  • Robert Spitzer, 1932-2015

    Perhaps Spitzer’s most famous achievement was the removal of the diagnosis of homosexuality as a mental disorder. In the early 70’s after meeting with gay-rights advocates, he examined the evidence for homosexuality as a pathologic condition. The issue was extremely contentious, but, in 1973, ultimately he concluded that there was no evidence to support same-sexual orientation as a pathologic condition.

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  • Jon M. Stolk

    Jon M. Stolk, Ph.D, M.D., focused his research on the characteristics of the synthetic enzymes in the norepinephrine and epinephrine pathways.

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  • Ellen Stover, 1950-2014

    It is unusual for an obituary to be written by more than one author, much less three. The fact that the three of us wished to honor and celebrate Ellen Stover in the ACNP journal is a testimony to the impact she has had on the field. Ellen personified the consummate NIH program officer. She tirelessly served her constituency—those whose grants were in “her” portfolio and advocated for them with NIMH leadership.

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  • A. Arthur Sugerman, 1929-2007

    A. Arthur Sugerman, M.D., published widely on the use of antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia as well as on EEG studies and addiction.

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  • Fridolin Sulser, 1927-2016

    Fridolin championed the theory that acute effects of tricylic antidepressant drugs were not directly responsible for thier therapeutic action. His research on the mechanism for the delayed effect of antidepressants was influenced by his friend and Nobel Prize winner, Earl Sutherland, who suggested that he should look beyond the synapse at the norepinephrine/adenylate cyclase signal transduction cascade. This strategy led to the discovery that antidepressant treatments (tricyclics, MAO inhibitors, and ECT), given on a clinically relevant time basis, reduced the responsiveness of the B-adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system to norepinephrine in limbic and cortical structures of the rat brain.

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  • John Tallman, 1947-2006

    John Tallman, Ph.D., was a pioneer of the properties of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor using pharmacological and molecular biological probes. In 2001, he became the president and CEO of Helicon Therapeutics, Inc., a biotech company with a focus on functional genomics of memory and therapeutics to enhance memory consolidation.

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  • Maharaj K. Ticku, 1948-2007

    In addition to his research contributions to molecular neurobiology, Dr. Raj Ticku was a critical leader at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He was an excellent teacher and played a key role in the recruitment of new talent to the Center and led many faculty and chair searches.

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  • Gary Tollefson 1951-2009

    During his academic career, Dr. Tollefson’s work focused primarily on antidepressants and anxiolytic drugs. He contributed important research on interaction of antidepressants and other psychotropic drugs with muscarinic-cholinergic receptors, predicting their propensity to produce anticholinergic side effects.

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  • William J. Turner, 1907-2006

    William J. Turner, M.D., was a first-generation psychiatric researcher, being almost alone in focusing on the biological cause of mental illness.

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  • Eberhard H. Uhlenhuth, 1927-2016

    Eberhard H. Uhlenhuth, M.D., was a leading investigator in the psychopharmacology of anxiety disorders and is well known globally as an expert in the psychopharmacology of benzodiazepines. His research was elegant in its aims and design, and his nearly 200 published papers were clear, incisive, and highly influential. His approach to understanding the scope of these agents was thoughtful and well reasoned, and this characterized his approach to science and his clinical work.

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  • Wylie Vale, 1941-2012

    Wylie W. Vale Jr., an eminent endocrinologist who helped identify the hormones through which the brain governs basic bodily functions and who was involved in a combative race for the Nobel Prize.

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  • Norm Weiner

    Norm Weiner, M.D., best known for his pioneering work on catecholamine synthesis, storage, and release, was equally committed to scientific research and to education, making enormous contributions to the development of leaders and to science policy.

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  • Paul Wender, 1934-2016

    Most would place the burgeoning of Paul’s career with his 1971 monograph demonstrating the reality of minimal brain dysfunction (MDD) in disturbed children. Further, against the conventional wisdom, genetic causality linked to a dopaminergic deficit was advocated. The MBD label fit the available data better than the still dubious causual implications of attentional disorder. His controlled studies uniquely concluded that MBD did not stop at puberty, but often continued into adulthood.

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  • Francis J. White, 1952-2006

    Francis J. White, Ph.D., a leader in the neurobiology of addiction, his research endeavors were supported continuously by NIDA, including a prestigious MERIT award.

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  • William Woolverton, 1951-2013

    Dr. William L. Woolverton, Billy S. Guyton Distinguished Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the University of Mississippi Medical Center died after a brief illness at the age of 62 on June 13, 2013. Prof. Woolverton, a member of ACNP, was a leading scientist and educator in the behavioral pharmacology of drugs of abuse.

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  • Arthur Yuwiler, 1927-2012

    Arthur Yuwiler once wrote that “in contrast to claims that art and science are two separate antithetical ways of approaching the world … they are, at base, the same”. He was the best example of such a synthesis, a true Renaissance-type humanist, brilliant scientist, creative artist and world traveler.

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  • Elizabeth A. Young

    Dr. Young was an internationally renowned biological psychiatrist who conducted seminal work on stress biology and its role in severe depression and other mood disorders. She was elected to the ACNP in 1996.

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